Weekly Mass Schedule


SUNDAY: January 26th - 3rd Sunday after Epiphany (sd)
Missa Pro Populo............................................................................................. 9:00 a.m. Mass
MONDAY: January 27th - St. John Chrysostom, BpCD (d)
†Repose of the Soul of Madeline Berry........................................................... No Mass
TUESDAY: January 28th - St. Peter Nolasco, C (d)
†Repose of the Soul of Madeline Berry........................................................... No Mass
WEDNESDAY: January 29th - St. Francis de Sales, BpCD (d)
†Repose of the Soul of Madeline Berry........................................................... No Mass
THURSDAY: January 30th - St. Martina, VM (sd)
†Repose of the Soul of Madeline Berry........................................................... No Mass
FRIDAY: January 31st - St. John Bosco, (d)
†Repose of the Soul of Madeline Berry........................................................... No Mass
SATURDAY: February 1st - St. Ignatius, BpM (d)
†Repose of the Soul of Madeline Berry........................................................... 9:00 a.m. Mass
SUNDAY: February 2nd - Purification of the BVM (d2cl)
Missa Pro Populo............................................................................................ 9:00 a.m. Mass

Sanctuary Lamp burning for the repose of the soul of Helen Ross.

Confession Schedule
Saturday — 8:30 a.m. - 8:55 a.m.
Sunday — 8:00 a.m. - 8:55 a.m.

Church Cleaning Schedule
Jan 26 — Penny Shevlin
Feb 2 — Rita Bogner & Barbara Kalafat
Feb 9 — Bomgardner Family, Ruth Evans

Treat Schedule
Jan 26 — Laura Lightner, Bernadette Dube
Feb 2 — Sarah Rollins, Hannah Lowder
Feb 9 — Melissa Bradshaw, Mary Drewes and Regina Drewes

Altar Boy Serving Schedule
Jan 26 — Oran Skierka & Blane Lightner
Feb 2 — MC - Oran Skierka Th - Nathan Rollins CB - Stephen Rollins
Ac - Killian Skierka & Kernan Skierka
TB - Brennan Skierka, Gabriel Lightner, Dominic Skierka
TB - William Lightner, Quentin Skierka, Louis Lightner
Feb 9 — Nathan Rollins & Dominic Skierka

Snow Removal
Jan 26 — Kevin Rollins — Brenden Rollins
Feb 2 — Max Kern, Alex Kern, and Ken Kern
Feb 9 — Pat Bogner — James Bogner

                                                                               Announcements

Blessing of Religious Articles: Following Mass next Sunday.
Summer School Dates: week of June 7 and June 14:

6 Day Votive Light Candles: The price per candle is $2.50 each, $60 per case.

Live stream sermons: you can now watch one of the SSPV or CSPV priests offer Mass in Boynton Beach, Florida. It is live streamed every Sunday at 500pm (eastern) and then archived. The address for this is http://tiny.cc/ourladyofpeace
SSPV Sermons may now be heard on You Tube channel wcbohio
Sanctuary Lamp: If you would like to have the Sanctuary Lamp burning for the repose of soul, anniversary or remembrances, and who requests it, the usual donation is $10. Fill out a request an return to Fr. Skierka
Fr. Jenkins online instructions: http://www.wcbohio.com/
Please Keep in your prayers: The deceased, ill and the injured and those that are in special need of prayers, particularly of our parish.
Blessing of Religious Articles: Following Mass next Sunday.
What Catholics Believe:"wbcohio" – http://www.wcbohio.com/ – Father Jenkins comments on some of the recent events of the SSPX, Fr. Davide Pagliarani; Fr. Patrick Girouard’s sermon on the SSPX’s re-branding, and other timely topics;..

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MONEY RUNS or RUINS the HOME
by Daniel A. Lord, S.J.

He might take the money of his citizens for a new palace, an expensive mistress, a silly hobby, the suppression of his people’s liberties, a senseless war. But once the people re-gained the right to control their own money, they could take the whip out of the hand of the tyrant and make him sit up and beg.
Today in any free country, taxes begin with the representatives of the people. The people refuse to give to anyone the power to take their money away from them. They know that the moment they do so they have given up their power and sacrificed their freedom. On the other hand, the most aspirating tyrant in the world is powerless unless he can command a large and unrestricted income.
Also at Home
We know how money and power go hand in hand politically. But that is equally true in the home.
The youngest son of the family starts to swagger a little when he has money in his pocket. The little girl with the dime in her pocket feels her power over her luckless penniless — and hence powerless — playmates who wait on her bounty. The young man with a fat roll of one-dollar bills in his pocket, stepping out for dinner and a dance, struts in complacent power.
The father who sits down to the monthly family bills and is conscious of his comfortable balance in the bank regards even the larger bills with a masterful eye. The wife who has a private income or a generous allowance from her wise hus-band walks serenely through the mysteries of household finance.
I am not stressing all these obvious instances merely in order to repeat what everyone knows. But it is most important that we remember that in the family, as everywhere else, money is power. When the person who controls the money is generous and gracious, he gives to the other members not only money, but varied measures of power. In consequence, his family is a happy one. When he doles out his money grudgingly, makes the others cringe and scrape and play the hypocrite, gives in miserly fashion or not at all, he is simply limiting the power and freedom of others. Inevitably a family like that cannot be happy. Power is too centralized and too tyrannically used there. The others live in subjection, act in subservience, and finally rebel or leave home to find their fortunes where they can.
Money is Freedom
In the same way, for obvious reasons money is connected with freedom. With-out some money one is practically a slave.
Did you ever hear a man say, in confident tone, “I can pay my own way”? Instantly you recognize this statement, not as a boast, but as a happy assertion of independence and freedom. He boldly announces that he is no hanger-on, thank you, no dependent, cringing “panhandler” waiting for “hand-outs” or charities. His well-lined pockets make possible freedom of movement. He is willing to admit that you can go your way. With equal freedom, he feels that he can go his way.
Without money, one is terribly handi-capped: One is not free to shop in the supermarket and lay in the week’s supply of groceries; one is not free to board a train for a holiday; one has to hunt for those rare free amusements that are pos-sible to a man without a purse; one is not free to plan on a long and elaborate education, to count on marriage and the establishing of a home, to set up in business or to enter upon some profession that needs preliminary capital.
Free at Home
So freedom within the home can be measured often enough in terms of the distribution of money. A fine, devoted husband who has no desire to see his wife financially bound to him hand and foot and dependent upon him for her every purchase or action or amusement is generous in the money that he gives her. Parents who wish to keep their young children from temptation will cut down their children’s freedom by the wise limiting of their allowances.

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1. The question is, what exactly does it mean, to dress modestly?
2. What does the Catholic Church say on the matter?

On January 12, 1930, the sacred Congregation of the Council, by mandate of Pope Pius XI, has issued emphatic instructions on modesty of dress to all bishops, directing them to insist on these prescriptions:
"We recall that a dress cannot be called decent which is cut deeper than two fingers breadth under the pit of the throat, which does not cover the arms at least to the elbows, and scarcely reaches a bit beyond the knee. Furthermore, dresses of transparent material are improper.

Women must be decently dressed, especially when they go to church. The parish priest may, with due prudence, refuse them entrance to the church and access to the reception of the Sacraments, [each] and every time that they come to church immodestly dressed." (General Pastoral Directive, 1915 A.D.)

"Girls and women dressed immodestly are to be debarred from Holy Communion and from acting as sponsors at the Sacraments of Baptism and Confirmation; further, if the offense be extreme, they may even be forbidden to enter the church." [Decree of the Congregation of the Council, 1930 A.D.]